My part in the History
Clyde Puffers

The Eilean Eisdeal

Just a few of my Puffer photos

I have always been into photography and found the puffer to be a great subject however the nature of the work did not always lend itself to taking a lot of photographs anyway I hope you enjoy some of these and the shots in the gallery section. The Puffer had a flat bottom and was designed to beach and discharge cargo at low water with the use of a derick, we improved on this method by installing an Atlas hydraulic crane with an extension that would reach the length of the hold and the highest wharfs around the isles, it did however take a while to perfect the crane extension and discharge through out which we did a lot of shoveling. The flat bottom meant we could discharge in places other coasters couldn't reach, this sounds like a beer advert, anyway that was fine but the downside was the sea worthiness, sailing on the puffers was like sailing in a cross between a washing machine and a submarine, the wheelhouse window in  one of the below photos had been staved in by a wave, and we had a board covering the window, the owner never really gave me grief about not sailing due to the weather but after we had a rough night in the Irish sea with him aboard that was understandable, I think all ship owners should go through a really crap 24 hr storm on a Puffer to understand life afloat.
© Galway Site Design
Clyde Puffers

The Eilean Eisdeal

Just a few of my Puffer photos

I have always been into photography and found the puffer to be a great subject however the nature of the work did not always lend itself to taking a lot of photographs anyway I hope you enjoy some of these and the shots in the gallery section. The Puffer had a flat bottom and was designed to beach and discharge cargo at low water with the use of a derick, we improved on this method by installing an Atlas hydraulic crane with an extension that would reach the length of the hold and the highest wharfs around the isles, it did however take a while to perfect the crane extension and discharge through out which we did a lot of shoveling. The flat bottom meant we could discharge in places other coasters couldn't reach, this sounds like a beer advert, anyway that was fine but the downside was the sea worthiness, sailing on the puffers was like sailing in a cross between a washing machine and a submarine, the wheelhouse window in  one of the below photos had been staved in by a wave, and we had a board covering the window, the owner never really gave me grief about not sailing due to the weather but after we had a rough night in the Irish sea with him aboard that was understandable, I think all ship owners should go through a really crap 24 hr storm on a Puffer to understand life afloat.
© 
For five years I was Master on the last Clyde Puffer to have a loadline Certifiate to carry cargo, she was called the Eilean Eisdeal .